Author Archives

Carol

Carol Borden was editor of and a writer for the Toronto International Film Festival’s official Midnight Madness and Vanguard program blogs. She is currently an editor at and evil overlord for The Cultural Gutter, a website dedicated to thoughtful writing about disreputable art. She has written for Mezzanotte, Teleport City, Die Danger Die Die Kill, Popshifter and she has a bunch of short stories published by Fox Spirit Books including: Godzilla detective fiction, femme fatale mermaids, an adventurous translator/poet, and an x-ray tech having a bad day. Read and listen to her other shenanigans at Monstrous Industry. For her particular take on gutter culture, check out, “In the Sewer with the Alligators.”

Clive Thompson wrote a terrific article on the economics of massive multiplayer online games that goes beyond the usual “people are making money with their hobby!” coverage and explores what virtual economics says about capitalism at large. Wonderfully readable, too.

People who’ve discovered the joy of stashing a couple of interviews on the mp3 players should check out The Agony Columns archive of interviews with SF writers and beyond like Jonathan Lethem.

Something Awful (whose slogan, The Internet Makes You Stupid, says a lot about the site) has a great parody of videogame hype, Solitaire 2: Solitaire Harder. Sample soundbite: “Authentic card sound effects beautifully recreate the real sounds of playing card games. The sound will be so amazing you’ll […]

After an intro like this, the game (Onimusha 3) will have to be a let-down. But still, if it has a tenth of the imaginative power it’ll tower above most games. And it’s not just because I’ve always wanted to fight zombie samurai within insectile zepplin-esque motherships.

Greg Costikyan tells science fiction writers: “I want to be challenged with interesting ideas, distinctive writing styles, unconventional ways of looking at things, and transportation to a world very different from our own. I don’t want to sink into the familiar, I want to be surprised and shaken […]

Dylan Horrocks writes: “New artforms bring new aesthetic paradigms. Those who fail to recognise this tend to miss the point of the work altogether, dismissing it as frivolous, bad or even dangerous.” A long article about comics, videogames, and fantasy novels.