Tag: Dashiell Hammett

Dashiell Hammett at Library of America

Library of America has Dashiell Hammett’s story, “Creeping Siamese” as it’s story of the week. ‘Based on the scantiest of evidence—a red silk sarong—the detectives, including the Continental Op, begin working under the assumption that they should be looking for ‘brown men,’ that is, Asian immigrants. ‘This short […]

“Dashiell Hammett’s Strange Career”

At The Paris Review, Anne Diebel considers Dashiell Hammett’s “strange career.” “In a 1929 interview with the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, Dashiell Hammett described his first attempts at ‘breadwinning.’ After dropping out of Baltimore Polytechnic Institute at 14, he worked as a messenger boy for the Baltimore and Ohio […]

“The Gutting of Couffignal”

Dashiell Hammett’s “The Gutting of Couffignal” is available for your reading pleasure at the Library of America’s blog. The story originally appeared in the Dec., 1925 issue of the influential pulp fiction magazine, Black Mask. Along with the story there’s a discussion of the publication pressures of writing […]

Noir, Illustrated

Some people like their hardboiled noir fiction in cinematic form. Some people prefer text only please–to enjoy, perhaps the racier metaphors and descriptions in The Maltese Falcon, say, over the screen adaptations. I like both. But what if I told you that you could get noir illustrated in […]

“Finding Marlowe”

Louise Ransil talks with the Los Angeles Times about private investigator Samuel B. Marlow. “Marlowe, she said, was the city’s first licensed black private detective. He shadowed lives, took care of secrets, knew his way around Tinseltown. Ransil dropped the names of some Hollywood heavies — Clark Gable, […]