Tag: 1900s

“Jean Arthur, The Nonconformist”

At Criterion, Kim Morgan writes about Jean Arthur. “Arthur plays drunk to perfection [in Mr. Smith Goes To Washington]. The entire scene is brilliantly executed, performed with flawless comic timing, by both actors. She’s got to be comical while not being so ridiculous that the moment is simply […]

“How Infections Defined the American Bathroom”

At Citylab, Elizabeth Yuko writes about how epidemics influenced the design of American bathrooms–and American homes. “This isn’t a linear narrative with clear causation, but rather a convergence of advancements in science, infrastructure, plumbing, sanitation and design trends. The modern bathroom developed alongside outbreaks of tuberculosis, cholera and […]

He Saw the Sea

Every April is Switcheroo Month here at the Gutter as each Editor writes about something outside their usual domain. This week SF/Fantasy Editor Keith writes about Langston Hughes’ life of adventure. ~~~ It was in the middle of a vicious squall on the way back from a port […]

“The Hat Pin Peril”

“On the afternoon of May 28, 1903, Leoti Blaker, a young Kansan touring New York City, boarded a Fifth Avenue stagecoach at 23rd Street and settled in for the ride. The coach was crowded, and when it jostled she noticed that the man next to her settled himself […]

The History Of Monopoly

At Smithsonian, Mary Pilon writes about the history of Monopoly. It was intended to teach people about income inequality. “In 1904, Magie received a patent for an invention she called the Landlord’s Game, a square board with nine rectangular spaces on each side, set between corners labeled ‘Go […]

“Catsuits, Boilersuits, and Racing Suits”

At the Vintagent, Paul D’Orléans writes about the history of one-piece utility suits from boilersuits to Catwoman and Girl On A Motorcycle (1968). “The story of the ‘boilersuit’ and its (super)heroic descendants is a curious tale; a purely functional clothing item historically laden with a mix of Utopian […]